Ubuntu Demon\’s blog

October 28, 2007

Laptop Hardrive Killer Bug – How to discover whether you are affected

Filed under: english — ubuntudemon @ 12:45 pm

Your harddisk shouldn’t spin-down/spin-up and/or park/unpark too much causing the mechanics of the harddrive to slowly detiorate. If this is happening you should see your Load_Cycle_Count increasing too fast.

The following things might cause aggressive power management :

  • your (laptop) harddrive firmware might have aggressive power management defaults (operating system independent)
  • your (laptop) BIOS might set your harddrive to use aggressive power management (operating system independent)
  • you might have enabled laptop-mode in /etc/default/acpi-support (disabled by default) which will set your harddrive to use aggressive power management

There’s another part of this problem (one of the following might be true) :

  • something wakes up the harddrive right after spinning down.
  • something unparks the head right after your harddisk head is parked.

To discover whether you suffer from this problem :

First install smartmontools to be able to query your harddrive :
$ sudo aptitude install smartmontools

To find your Load_Cycle_Count do this (the last number is the number we are interested in) :
$ sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | grep Load_Cycle_Count

If this number is growing rapidly (on average more than 90 per day) then you might suffer from this problem.

The reason I’m saying to look for an average of more than 90 per day is because it will guarantee that your Load_Cycle_Count is less than 100.000 in three years : 90 * 365 * 3 = 98.550. As you can see I chose this number of 90 quite arbitrarily but it should almost guarantee that your harddrive won’t die during the first three years due to a high Load_Cycle_Count. It’s possible that a value below 180 per day is still okay (180 * 365 * 3 = 197.100).

Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances. My harddrive started to slowly die when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000 after 10 months of use (Feisty and a little bit of Gutsy).
IMHO this bug should get critical status because it’s killing people’s harddrives.

More information about this bug :

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49 Comments »

  1. Please stop bumping timestamps to get it to the top of Planet :/

    Comment by pricechild — October 28, 2007 @ 1:08 pm

  2. Thanks for this. My drive was at almost 500,000 load cycles and rising fast, until I put into place one of the ‘fixes’.

    Comment by Chad D — October 28, 2007 @ 2:14 pm

  3. Thanks for th post, but what am I looking for? I got this output:

    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 077 077 000 Old_age Always – 46765

    What does the different numbers mean?

    Comment by Kjetil Rydland — October 28, 2007 @ 2:26 pm

  4. I’m getting no output after typing in the command:

    sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | grep Load_Cycle_Count

    What do I do?

    Comment by ch4rm — October 28, 2007 @ 2:58 pm

  5. oh. I needed to change to /dev/hda.

    simbala@gerbert:~$ sudo smartctl -a /dev/hda | grep Load_Cycle_Count
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0012 057 057 000 Old_age Always – 437604

    Is this bad?

    Comment by ch4rm — October 28, 2007 @ 3:07 pm

  6. In my case Load_Cycle_Count value excdeded one milion. This number is growing It seems to be operating system independent issue because on Windows XP this number is growing in similar rate as on Ubuntu.

    Comment by ximian — October 28, 2007 @ 3:34 pm

  7. Shall I be worry if I get smartctl returns this ?
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0012 075 075 000 Old_age Always – 256950

    It just grows by 17 in about 5 minutes.

    Comment by Lucky — October 28, 2007 @ 4:18 pm

  8. [...] Laptop Hardrive Killer Bug – How to discover whether you are affected « Ubuntu Demon’s blog (tags: ubuntu fix bug linux harddrive laptop important) [...]

    Pingback by » links for 2007-10-28 It tastes like burning: Ramblings from someone who really doesn’t have much to say — October 28, 2007 @ 10:17 pm

  9. I tried that and smartctl says

    Error Counter logging not supported
    Device does not support Self Test logging

    Is there any other way to test the Load_Cycle_Count? Googling didn’t help. Thanks.

    Comment by randomwalker — October 28, 2007 @ 11:46 pm

  10. [...] After seeing Stefano’s second post on hard drive life under Ubuntu, and posts from Roald Hopman on planet ubuntu, I decided to check out my laptop drive: $ sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda|grep [...]

    Pingback by Hard Drive Life « Feeding the Penguins — October 29, 2007 @ 9:02 am

  11. to pricechild :
    I have no idea how to prevent timestamps from being changed when editting a post on wordpress.com

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 1:29 pm

  12. to Kjetil Rydland :

    the last number of “46765″ is your Load_Cycle_Count

    Watch how fast it increases. My harddrive started slowly dying when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000

    Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 1:32 pm

  13. Read this if “$ smartctl -a /dev/sda | grep Load_Cycle_Count” doesn’t work.

    $df -h

    to find the name of your harddrive. For example it might be /dev/hda instead of /dev/sda. So try replacing /dev/sda with the name of your device.

    Don’t forget to install smartmontools :
    $sudo aptitude install smartmontools

    Check whether your drive has S.M.A.R.T capability and whether it is enabled :
    $ sudo smartctl -i /dev/sda

    If your drive has S.M.A.R.T. capability and has S.M.A.R.T. disabled then try enabled S.M.A.R.T. :
    $sudo smartctl -s on /dev/sda

    You can also try removing the part “| grep Load_Cycle_Count” part and look manually for a variable with a name resembling to Load_Cycle_Count

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 1:37 pm

  14. to ch4rm :

    Your Load_Cycle_Count is “437604″.

    Watch how fast it increases. My harddrive started slowly dying when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000

    Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 1:40 pm

  15. to Lucky :

    If you Load_Cycle count grows by 17 in about 5 minutes you should make these “ugly” manual fixes.

    My harddrive started slowly dying when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000

    Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 1:43 pm

  16. I have a two-year old powerbook G4, with a Seagate Momentus 5400.2 series 100GB. They also report a minimal lifetime of 600,000 cycles (http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/datasheet/disc/ds_momentus5400.pdf)

    Mine is however already at 1,900,000! (more than three times as much), and still increasing rapidly. I use Ubuntu Gutsy at the moment.

    I ran the following script:
    while (true); do smartctl -a /dev/hda | grep 193 >> hw.txt; sleep 60; done

    And the output was:
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897663
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897663
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897663
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897664
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897664
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897664
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897664
    7 Seek_Error_Rate 0x000f 057 057 030 Pre-fail Always – 558423241934
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897670
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897671
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897674
    193 Load_Cycle_Count 0×0032 001 001 000 Old_age Always – 1897677

    So, once an error occured, and in 12 minutes it increased by 16! This does not look that good, doesn’t it?

    Sander

    Comment by Sander — October 29, 2007 @ 6:19 pm

  17. to Sander :

    Your WORST(1) is almost at your THRESHOLD (0) you should make backups of all your data and run the diagnostic tool of your harddrive manufacturer. You might have to buy a new harddrive.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 29, 2007 @ 7:20 pm

  18. [...] Tonight on GeekNights, we discuss CPU architectures such as x86 in an easy-to-understand way. In the news, Scott achieves fleeting Internet fame with a blog post about Linux device drivers, and Ubuntu may well be destroying your hard drive. [...]

    Pingback by Front Row Crew - GeekNights » Blog Archive » GeekNights 071029 - CPU Architectures — October 30, 2007 @ 2:11 am

  19. I checked again today and the number is now: 444630.

    Is that safe?

    Comment by ch4rm — October 30, 2007 @ 2:18 pm

  20. to ch4rm :

    That would mean roughly 3500 Load_Cycles per day for you. IMHO you should consider applying the ugly fix :
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/26/laptop-hardrive-killer-bug/#comment-31234

    You should also consider backing up all your data and running the diagnostic tool of your harddrive manufacturer to test your harddrive for problems.

    My harddrive started slowly dying when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000. Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances.

    Good luck!

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 30, 2007 @ 2:33 pm

  21. Ubuntu is NOT causing aggressive power management.

    The following things might instead cause aggressive power management settings :

    * your (laptop) harddrive firmware might have aggressive power management defaults (operating system independent)
    * your (laptop) BIOS might set your harddrive to use aggressive power management (operating system independent)
    * you might have enabled laptop-mode in /etc/default/acpi-support (disabled by default) which will set your harddrive to use aggressive power management

    These aggressive power management settings are set by your BIOS or harddrive firmware. Windows and/or Mac OS X might be overriding these settings which might make Ubuntu look bad if Ubuntu doesn’t override these settings.

    Read here what Matthew Garret an experienced and well known Ubuntu Developer has said about this problem :
    http://www.advogato.org/person/mjg59/diary/82.html

    for more information see :
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/ubuntu-is-not-causing-aggressive-power-management/

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 30, 2007 @ 7:49 pm

  22. I’m a big fan of Ubuntu. I don’t want to see Ubuntu hurt because it’s not Ubuntu who is setting these aggressive power management defaults.

    Some background of the problem :

    If your harddrive spins down and spins up again your Load_Cycle_Count increases by one. If your harddrive head parks and unparks again your Load_Cycle_Count increases by one.

    You don’t want your Load_Cycle_Count to increase too fast.

    Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances. My harddrive started to die slowly when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000.

    Ubuntu is NOT causing aggressive power management.

    The following things might instead cause aggressive power management settings :

    * your (laptop) harddrive firmware might have aggressive power management defaults (operating system independent)
    * your (laptop) BIOS might set your harddrive to use aggressive power management (operating system independent)
    * you might have enabled laptop-mode in /etc/default/acpi-support (disabled by default) which will set your harddrive to use aggressive power management

    These aggressive power management settings are set by your BIOS or harddrive firmware. Windows and/or Mac OS X might be overriding these settings which might make Ubuntu look bad if Ubuntu doesn’t override these settings.

    Read here what Matthew Garret an experienced and well known Ubuntu Developer has said about this problem :
    http://www.advogato.org/person/mjg59/diary/82.html

    for more information see :
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/acpi-support/+bug/59695
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/30/ubuntu-is-not-causing-aggressive-power-management


    If you think you might be suffering from this problem here’s an ugly fix :
    the ugly fix

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 10:21 am

  23. The smartctl values aren’t always easy to interpret. If the Load_Cycle_Counter value behaves as a counter and is below impossible to reach values it’s probably the right number.

    You can also look at “WORST” and “TRESHOLD” (|more instead of |grep to easily see which value is “WORST” and which value is “TRESHOLD”) :
    $ sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda | more

    If WORST is lowering (too fast) than you might be suffering from this problem. You can roughly calculate how long it will take for WORST to reach TRESHOLD if you keep watching those values daily/weekly. The closer WORST (starts at 100 or 200 from what I have seen) is to THRESHOLD the likelier it is for your drive to die from a high Load_Cycle_Count.

    From https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/acpi-support/+bug/17216/comments/40 :
    [quote=Brian Visel]

    Something to bear in mind as well:

    smartmon does not always report SMART values as you might think. Different values are stored in different ways by different manufacturers.

    Namely, if you do the smartctl check, wait for the click, and do it again immediately after, you may find that the amount has increased by more than one. In this case, it’s a pretty safe bet that the number you’re seeing isn’t accurate.

    Also, it’s a pretty safe bet (though not guaranteed) that you can get the real value by dividing by the amount it increments by. So, if the value you see first is 477,296, and then it clicks once, and the value is 477,312 (difference of 16), it’s a pretty safe bet that the number you’re really dealing with is more along the lines of 29,831 to 29,832, in which case you have no worries.

    [/quote]

    If you think you might be suffering from this problem you might want to apply the ugly fix :
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/26/laptop-hardrive-killer-bug/#comment-31234

    If you think your harddrive might start dying soon you should make backups of all your data and run the diagnostic tool of your harddrive manufacturer.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 2:36 pm

  24. to Sander ::

    Your WORST(1) is almost at your THRESHOLD (0) you should make backups of all your data and run the diagnostic tool of your harddrive manufacturer. You might have to buy a new harddrive.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 2:39 pm

  25. Hi, I want to know if this bug just appears when the laptops are pĺugged to the AC cable?

    In thirty minutes the load cycle number increased by 4 but with the AC cable seems to increase at a rate of one by minute!

    Should I apply the ugly fix?

    Comment by Weeber — October 31, 2007 @ 2:40 pm

  26. to Weeber :

    laptop-mode is disabled by default. If you have enabled laptop-mode your Load_Cycle_Count will increase faster when on battery.

    These aggressive powermanagement settings can also be set by BIOS or harddrive firmware.

    If you are sure your Load_Cycle count increases by one per minute you should probably enable the ugly fix :
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/26/laptop-hardrive-killer-bug/#comment-31234

    You might want to take a look at how fast your WORST value approaches your THRESHOLD value:
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/28/laptop-hardrive-killer-bug-how-to-discover-whether-you-are-affected/#comment-31741

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 2:56 pm

  27. 448651 is my Load_Cycle_Count number for today. That’s 4015 more than yesterday. Do you think it’s small enough of a problem to hold me over to Hardy? In 6 months, they should have a bug fix that doesn’t take advanced steps to fix, right? :D I’ll wait for Hardy if that’s the case.

    Comment by ch4rm — October 31, 2007 @ 3:18 pm

  28. to ch4rm :

    If you would wait until Hardy you have a big chance of a dead harddrive. I hope an official fix will be released soon.

    To help them realise the seriousness of the situation you should reply to this bug report :
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/acpi-support/+bug/17216

    You should include this information :
    * whether you have enabled laptop-mode (disabled by default)
    * the output of $sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda
    * the age of your disk
    * an estimate of the total hours your disk has been running since you started using it (to compare to Power_on_Hours because that value might be off)
    * an estimate of the average increase of Load_Cycle_Count during one hour and during one day on AC (before applying any “ugly” fixes)
    * any other information you consider relevant

    After that you should apply the ugly fix or wait a couple of days for an official fix but don’t wait too long.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 3:30 pm

  29. If you think you might be suffering from this problem then read this :
    http://ubuntudemon.wordpress.com/2007/10/26/laptop-hardrive-killer-bug/#comment-31234

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 3:39 pm

  30. for folks who see “Device does not support self test logging” you might want to specify device type instead of allowing ‘smartctl’ to guess.

    eg. I had to use

    sudo smartctl -d ata -a /dev/sda

    Comment by ragav — October 31, 2007 @ 4:35 pm

  31. Thanks for your dedication on this issue ubuntudemon, the community really apreciates it.

    I have a question, how can I set back to the defaults the values you change with the “ugly ixes”?

    Comment by Weeber — October 31, 2007 @ 6:54 pm

  32. to Weeber :

    You are welcome :)

    Only do the “ugly fixes” if you understand what they do and how to revert to the defaults. If you decide to do “ugly fixes” it’s on your own risk.

    If you need to revert the “ugly fixes” you need to edit your /etc/hdparm.conf and remove the lines you added (unless an official fix would set the same). You would also need to remove the 99-hdd-spin-fix.sh files.

    Comment by ubuntudemon — October 31, 2007 @ 9:41 pm

  33. I have combined all active threads about the “laptop harddrive Load_Cycle_Count issue” on the ubuntuforums.

    People who have support questions can ask them here :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=591503

    Comment by ubuntudemon — November 1, 2007 @ 1:16 pm

  34. I’ve applied the ugly fixes but the numbers seems to be increasing in the same way. Can you tell me which should be the ‘normal’ interval between each increase of the Load_Cycle_Count number? I know this number isn’t constant but tell me which you think it is, just to give an idea it could be helpful to more than one.

    Comment by Weeber — November 2, 2007 @ 4:57 pm

  35. to Weeber :

    What kind of value did you try for power management in the ugly fix ?

    254 should give the most performance and the least increase of Load_Cycle_Count. Some people might need 255 instead of 254. A value of 128 means less power usage and less heat, no spin downs but you still will get parking/unparking. You should probably first try 254 / 255 and if you have problems with heat or you want to decrease power usage you can experiment a little.

    Harddrive manufacturers seem to claim most harddrives can handle at least 600.000 Load_Cycles but this is probably an average under ideal circumstances. My harddrive started to slowly die when at a Load_Cycle_Count of 200.000 after 10 months of use (Feisty and a little bit of Gutsy).

    It’s important to look at worst and threshold. You need make a rough calculation about when your worst will reach your threshold. When worst reaches threshold it’s likely but not guaranteed that your disk might start dying soon.

    Please use this thread for support questions :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=591503

    Comment by ubuntudemon — November 2, 2007 @ 5:44 pm

  36. A fix that is not so ugly.

    My hard drive totaled about 140k load cycles in less than 45 days on a new T61p, ACH! Since purchasing this machine I’ve had Fedora 7 running for a few weeks and for the last week Gutsy, BTW f7 is a nightmare on a T61, gutsy rocks. After doing some google-ing around and reading the bug reports I tried this simple fix with nice results. Since implementing about 3 hours or so ago I have only had 2 load cycles, where before I was averaging 1 per minute. And the temperature is holding at 32c.

    Install laptop laptop-mode-tools
    Sudo Apt-get install laptop-mode-tools
    This is installed by default but run the command to be sure.

    Update the following files.

    /etc/default/acpi-support

    update :: ENABABLE_LATOP_MODE=true
    note : this is disabled by default.

    /etc/laptop-mode/laptop-mode.conf

    update :: CONTROLL_HD_POWERMGMT=1

    Comment by cuzz — November 6, 2007 @ 7:54 pm

  37. [...] fast this is increasing, I have a loop running on a terminal that checks the value every 5 minutes (This dude’s idea) and for the past hour it hasn’t changed. That’s made me rather happy. Here’s the [...]

    Pingback by George Files » Checking if your laptop hard drive is being killed - Fujitsu MHW1200BH — November 7, 2007 @ 3:19 pm

  38. [...] also trying to get my hard drive to spin down while off power. The load cycle bug (still annoying) should only be a problem if the system keeps actively kicking the hard drive into [...]

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  39. very nice topic.. i hav another problem also. can any body tell me how will i find that either my RAM is defected or not.

    Comment by Mr. Asif — June 2, 2008 @ 6:14 am

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  43. I can confirm that this bug affects Windows Vista too.

    My dual boot Hardy and Vista Acer 5902G with A Western Digital WD2500BEVS-22UST0 has the head parking bug and with Linux it was parking up to twice a minute till I applied the fix hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda.

    I marked the count and booted Vista in three hours the count had increased by 180, visible when I returned to Hardy.

    So this is not a Linux problem and my hard would break under Vista too.

    Both OSes need patched.

    But this fix is not trivial for noobs and Ubuntu need to step up to the plate and fix this with an update or at least have a very easy howto, I had to figure it out from blogs (thanks muchly) and the comments as I didn’t know /etc/acpi had been deprecated to /etc/pm.

    So to confirm this is a hard drive bug for both OSes and Linux is the only one with a fix or even a means of detecting it.

    Perhaps I can disable power management in Vista, but as I only use it for Team Fortress 2 – I will just try to get that going under WINE.

    Comment by jas malcolm — July 26, 2008 @ 12:40 am

  44. Thanks for the post

    Comment by brivetevaNime — August 2, 2008 @ 10:15 pm

  45. Hi, I happened upon this post by chance when reading about the new features in Ubuntu 8.10 and how this bug has not been fixed yet. Unfortunately, on my computer this bug appears to be specific to Ubuntu. Specifically, I am running “Workbench Linux”, a derivative of Xubuntu, on a two-year-old Gateway MX6448 laptop (AMD64 Turion X2 TL-50 at 1.6 GHz, 120 GB Hitachi HDD at 4200 rpm, 2 GB RAM). Under the Xubuntu derivative, the Load_Count_Cycle increases continuously, almost like a clock ticking off seconds: almost every time I ran the smartctl command, it had increased from the previous count. Right now, however, I am running Debian on the same computer (I triple-boot Workbench Linux / i386, Debian “Lenny/testing” for AMD64, and Windows XP on it) and the Load_Cycle_Count has not increased AT ALL, in 34 minutes’ uptime, fixed at a count of 98924. As soon as I finish posting this, I plan to reboot into Windows XP for a while to check how that goes and what effect that has on the Load_Cycle_Count (I’ll verify any increase by booting back into Debian). I was wondering if anyone had any explanation for the differing behavior under Xubuntu and Debian, and just wanted to put my two cents out there to be considered by those who say this is not an (X)Ubuntu problem. Should I apply any of the “ugly fixes” on that side? Thanks.

    Comment by Diego — September 5, 2008 @ 6:52 pm


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